What’s holding you back, Scott and Cory, from voting yes?

Hikers, horseback riders, hunters, four-wheelers, mountain bikers, fishermen, ranchers, farmers, business owners, outdoor recreationists, county commissioners, mayors, city councils, committee members and their families all support the CORE Act. What’s already established for their use of lands stands and will continue. How about honoring the culmination of years of community discussions and compromises?

Note that Oil and Gas was not included because they are being limited — limited minimally in their big picture and spreadsheets.

There’s a huge grassroots tsunami here. Are you really in touch with the people? Or just certain special interest groups?

Each of the four areas being protected have their iconic areas and features. The awesome Sneffels Range is out my back door and should not be broken up by an artificial boundary.

Colorado’s population is exploding, so it’s very important to protect what’s drawing people here.

Diane Thompson

Montrose


Colorado River drought contingency plan concerns

I would like to take a moment a point out a few concerns about the Colorado River drought contingency plan.

First of all, the 1922 Colorado River Compact states in Article III, the Upper Basin states are to provide 7500000 acre-feet of water per annum (year), plus even more to the Lower Basin states.

The proposed plan states, “UB states have agreed to a multi-pronged approach” to begin the process of rebuilding the “savings account” for Colorado and the Upper Basin. This savings in Lake Powell does not benefit the Upper Basin at all. The water that leaves this state is gone. Cloud-seeding only works if the jet stream is kind enough to bless us with storms as demonstrated this last winter. The tamarisk eradication should be an ongoing battle.

My opinion in this matter is quite simple. The amount called for in the 1922 compact should be changed from a quantitative amount, to a percentage of what is available. Hydrology and snowpack levels have become a known science and the experts in the field are adept knowing how much water the mountains will yield each season. While conserving water is a key component to proper water management, water usage in the Lower Basin needs to be addressed immediately.

Please read the 1922 compact, which is easily Googled for yourself. We need to protect our water for future generations and have more water storage right here in Colorado.

Steven F. Hallenborg

Montrose

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